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Here's Where Politicos Go Now For Tasteful Botox and Fillers

Image via Dr. Noëlle Sherber/<a href="https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=868190959875385&amp;set=a.498377680190050.120123.201072453253909&amp;type=1&amp;theater">Facebook</a>
Image via Dr. Noëlle Sherber/Facebook

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D.C. talking heads are just as scared of HD television as actors in Hollywood. The Washington Post's Roxanne Roberts delves into the "specific Washington kind of vanity" that keeps local dermatologists and plastic surgeons busy, especially during the summer months when patients can take time off to recover. Roberts talks with the husband-and-wife team of dermatologist Noëlle Sherber and plastic surgeon Ariel Rad, who just opened an office downtown with a retail store and a secret entrance for high-profile patients. And word-of-mouth has been everything for the Sherber + Rad office, according to Roberts:

Mondays and Tuesdays are always busy with patients who need to look great on Sunday talk shows. Summers, especially the days before three-day weekends, are booked solid. And all year long, they get pulled aside at parties for curbside consultations; it's always a little awkward, but understandable.

No one wants to look 25, but they absolutely don't want to look old. And having a secret entrance to your office is key for these clients. "I have a back entrance, which has come in very handy," D.C. dermatologist and "Queen of Laser" Tina Alster told the Post. "The Secret Service definitely knows that back entrance."
· Washington's Secret to Staying Relevant: A Little Botox Here, a Tuck There [WaPo]
· Sherber + Rad [Official Site]
· Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery [Official Site]